Sereno will be considered impeached with 1/3 vote of House, says Omidyar’s Rappler

Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno speaks before the Ateneo de Manila University’s Class of 2017.(File photo)

“If one-third of the House votes in favor of a committee report that recommends impeachment, Sereno will be deemed impeached. The complaint will be sent to the Senate, which will determine if Sereno is guilty or not.” — Rappler

This, explained by Omidyar Network’s Rappler website, would be how the impeachment complaint against Philippine Supreme Court Justice Lourdes Sereno will proceed:

 On Thursday, the committee will vote on each allegation one by one.  (House committee on justice Rep. Reynaldo Umali)  said they may remove or even add the grounds against Sereno, depending on the findings they’ve made during the committee hearings.

Among the grounds that Umali highlighted include Sereno’s alleged failure to pay the right taxes, her disregard for the en banc in making decisions, and the results of her psychological examination upon applying for the post.

A vote of majority of the committee is needed for it to recommend her impeachment or the sacking of the Gadon complaint. (When voting, quota is determined by the number of regular members. The committee also counts House leaders as ex-officio or automatic members.)

It will then reach plenary the week of March 21, or the last day of session before Congress adjourns. If one-third of the House votes in favor of a committee report that recommends impeachment, Sereno will be deemed impeached. The complaint will be sent to the Senate, which will determine if Sereno is guilty or not.

The House committee on justice, meanwhile, will formalize its team of prosecutors.

In the Rappler article, Rappler blogger Bea Cupin  expressed the opinion that “the writing on the wall is clear: Umali is already talking about crafting articles of impeachment.”

The impeachment of its chief justice has taken the Philippines by storm and has resurrected bitter memories of the previous impeachment of the late Renato Corona as chief justice during the last administration.

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Samantha Santos-Ellis is the US Inquirer news analyst for Southeast Asia and US-Pacific. Email: [email protected]